Rap Music, Brash And Swaggering, Enters Mainstream, by Glenn Collins

"'Rap has really begun to get around the mainstream culture,' said Robert Farris Thompson, a professor of African and Afro-American art history at Yale University. Hip-hop words from what was once an underclass subculture are now common parlance among America's youth. 'Rappers are persons of words, and those words are getting into the language,' said Professor Thompson."

The Connecticut Shore of the Sound, illustrated by William M. Gibson.

"Numerous converging and intersecting railways, extensive manufactures, and a considerable West-India commerce, contribute to the life and wealth of this beautiful city. Its suburbs are adorned with tasteful villas, and afford inviting drives and charming prospects. Of principal interest among its suburban attractions are the crags known as East and West Rocks — two bold and striking bluffs of trap-rock, lifting themselves, in magnificent array of opposition, about four hundred feet out of the plain which skirts the city. Their geological origin was probably some anomalous volcanic convulsion; and their grim heights may have sentinelled, in remote ages of our planet, the flow of the Connecticut River between their august feet to the Sound."

The Celebration of the Two Hundredth Anniversary of the Founding of Yale College, Held at Yale University, in New Haven, Connecticut, October the Twentieth to October the Twenty-Third, A. D. Nineteen Hundred and One

"President Theodore Roosevelt, who was the chief figure of the closing day of Yale's bicentennial celebrations, given an ovation as he receives his honorary degree. He pays a tribute to the sons of old Eli. 'I have never yet worked at a task worth doing that I did not find myself shoulder to shoulder with some son of Yale.'"

ALL OF ONE FAMILY. Three Prominent Men Descended From Roger Sherman.

"William M. Evarts, the polished, urbane, witty New Yorker; George Frisbie Hoar, the sharp, petulant, bright, nagging New Englander; John Sherman, the unostentatious, but persistent Westerner. But behind all these mannerisms we see the [Roger] Sherman imprint upon the mind of each. If one of them becomes President, it will be all in the family."

Women of Yale, by Harriet H. Coffin

"For the first time in its long male history, Yale College last month graduated women — 182 in a class of 1,132. Called superwomen when first admitted two years ago as transfer students, they have frequently scored higher academically than their male classmates. But they don't feel like superwomen. The job market is even leaner for them than for their male classmates; and their two years at Yale have been rougher than expected."

Yale History Made By Freshman Girl

"It was about 12:05 p.m. in Connecticut Hall on the Old Campus quadrangle, when registrations lines opened for the 1,255 freshmen of the Class of 1973, the first Yale undergraduate class with women... The freshmen co-eds will all be housed in Vanderbilt Hall."

In conversation: Gregory Crewdson and Richard Deming, by Gideon Broshy

"This happened last fall and the fall before: I’m at the Union League with a visiting writer and some colleagues, and I’m sitting in the window and it’s late fall and I look out — and there’s a streetlight on Chapel, and there’s the leaves, and I think — two years in a row, it’s happened — this looks like one of Gregory’s photographs. Which is interesting because people talk about your work’s engagement with film, which is absolutely [important to me], but what was interesting to me was that, nope, his work has shaped not my sense of film but my sense of the real world. Which is I think what great art does, it gives you a way of seeing the world anew."

New Haven’s Cultural Offerings Make The City An Attractive Destination, by Christopher Capozziello

"Trees bloom on the campus of Yale University April 16, 2008 in New Haven, Connecticut. New Haven boasts many educational and cultural offerings that attract visitors to the city."

When the City Was a Silver Screen, by Richard Kim

"A culture that is primarily visual leaves no trace of its passage. It is unrecordable. Knowing this, it's still possible to get fragments of narratives, to imagine a grander architecture from the imprints of a crumbling building, and to reconstruct a small look at the past -- albeit inevitably colored by the present, by nostalgia and television and regret."

On a Pair of Leather Suspenders.

"Across the street Vanderbilt Hall loomed indistinctly. To the ignorant it may be necessary to explain that its courtyard is open to Chapel Street, but that an iron grill stretches from wing to wing and keeps out the town. This grill is high enough for Hagenbeck, and it used to be a favorite game with us to play animal behind it for the street's amusement. At the hour when the crowd issued from the matinée at the Hyperion Theatre, our wittiest students paced on all fours up and down behind this grill and roared for raw beef."