EXPLORE THE U. S. CAPITOL ART — Roger Sherman Statue, by Chauncey B. Ives

"We enter, directly beneath the great Rotunda, the so-called Crypt, a circular chamber with a coronade of forty Doric columns, modeled after the Temple at Paestum. These columns are surmounted by groined arches supporting the floor above. The exact center of the Capitol building is indicated by a star in the pavement... The sub-basement, below this crypt, was originally planned to contain the tomb of George Washington. Since 1865 it has been the receptacle of the bier used to sustain the coffin of Abraham Lincoln and other notable Americans who have lain in state in the Capitol."

ROGER SHERMAN TABLET.

"Upon the site of this building stood the home of Roger Sherman, and near here in 1793 he died, jurist - patriot - statesman, signer of the Bill of Rights, Articles of Confederation, Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States, first Mayor of New Haven, Treasurer of Yale College, and for twenty years a member of Congress -- Washington claimed his friendship and counsel, and was here his guest in 1789 -- to record his great service in the founding and early government of our country, this tablet is placed by the Connecticut society, Sons of the American Revolution, 1904."

The Roger Sherman Watch

"It was a primitive-looking silver watch, made in France in 1760, that belonged to Roger Sherman -- was in his fob when he stood with Jefferson, &c., before Hancock, reporting 'The Declaration of Independence.'"

The Theater of New England

"[A] prominent trait of his character -- to give the people what they want and demand. Mr. Bunnell's long training with P. T. Barnum has schooled him thoroughly in the art of amusement catering... This is the ninth year of his theatrical management in New Haven, and the years have been successions of triumphs. Mr. Bunnell... is fully equipped to supply the people with the amusements they want, for [he] so thoroughly understand[s] the wants of the New Haven public. The time will come, added Mr. Bunnell, when the Hyperion will be denominated 'The theater of New England.'"

Rebecca Prescott Sherman

"Roger Sherman journeyed on horseback from New Haven, where he had moved after his wife Elizabeth's death, to visit his brother Josiah, who was then settled over his church in Woburn, Massachusetts. Upon his departure, his brother accompanied him some little distance, when they stopped to say a few parting words. As they were bidding… Continue reading Rebecca Prescott Sherman

Schoolboys posed at the entrance of the Hyperion Theatre, premiering the film Birth of a Nation

"'Birth of a Nation,' will be shown here. S. Z. Poli has secured exclusive New England rights for, 'The Birth of a Nation,' regarded as the biggest and most dramatic motion picture play which has been produced in this country. This play was shown in New York for more than a year and in Boston… Continue reading Schoolboys posed at the entrance of the Hyperion Theatre, premiering the film Birth of a Nation

President George Washington dropped in for tea

"Of all the distinguished guests with whose names tavern traditions are proudly linked, Washington is of course the most eminent. The tavern that can boast of having given him shelter for a night has ten times the chance of preservation accorded the ordinary old building. Here we trace carefully the hostelries honoured by the President's… Continue reading President George Washington dropped in for tea