TO GEORGE WASHINGTON, PRESIDENT of the UNITED STATES of AMERICA: Intelligence by the Last Mail — October 21, 1789.

"The citizens of this place were highly gratified by the presence of The President of the United States, who came to town last Saturday afternoon in good health. The next day he attended Divine Service in Trinity Church. His Excellency the Governor, his Hon. the Lieutenant Governor, Hon. Roger Sherman, the Hon. the Speaker, of the House of Representatives, with the Treasurer, dined with him; — and attended the afternoon Service, at the Rev. Dr. Edwards's Meeting. "

HISTORIC RENOVATIONS: Sherman’s Taverne by the Green— 1984

"The bar area and the dining room are next to one another and are of approximately equal size. The furnishings in each were selected to conform to the general character of the spaces. A large brass chandelier hangs over the brick bar. The paneling and stained glass in the dining room were existing and restored to their original condition."

THE TOUR OF GENERAL WASHINGTON IN 1789, by Katharine M. Abbott

"The Road for the greater part, indeed the whole way, was very rough and stoney, but the Land strong... The City of New Haven occupies a good deal of ground, but is thinly, though regularly laid out and built. The number of Souls in it are said to be about 4000. There is an Episcopal Church, three Congregational Meeting Houses, and a College, in which are at this time about 120 Students under Auspices of Doctor Styles [Ezra Stiles]."

A heritage collection of United States stamps commemorating the Bicentennial, by the U. S. Postal Service, 1976

"The 'Spirit of 76.' It has endured for two hundred years. It was there — unformed and unnamed — the night disguised patriots threw chests of British-taxed tea into Boston Harbor. It became a fearful reality as rebel drum beats summoned Minutemen to Lexington Green. It was proudly declared in that summer of 1776, when men signed their names to a document that began,'When, in the course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another...' It was formally conceded by the British five years later, on the fields of Yorktown, as the American, General Lincoln, received the sword of defeated Cornwallis. Many fought to keep that spirit alive. Young, old, famous, unknown. Benjamin Franklin was 70 the year he signed the Declaration of Independence."

The New Haven Cadets, 1775

"Very early the next morning, General George Washington reviewed the local troops on the Green and set out to continue their journey, escorted as far as the historic 'Neck Bridge' by the Second Company of the Governor's Guard, another uniformed company and the company that had been recruited from the students of Yale College, and accompanied by a great number of the inhabitants of the town. Noah Webster, heading the procession with his fife, or to use his own words, 'It fell to my humble lot to lead this company with music.'"

EXPLORE THE U. S. CAPITOL ART — Roger Sherman Statue, by Chauncey B. Ives

"We enter, directly beneath the great Rotunda, the so-called Crypt, a circular chamber with a coronade of forty Doric columns, modeled after the Temple at Paestum. These columns are surmounted by groined arches supporting the floor above. The exact center of the Capitol building is indicated by a star in the pavement... The sub-basement, below this crypt, was originally planned to contain the tomb of George Washington. Since 1865 it has been the receptacle of the bier used to sustain the coffin of Abraham Lincoln and other notable Americans who have lain in state in the Capitol."

ROGER SHERMAN TABLET.

"Upon the site of this building stood the home of Roger Sherman, and near here in 1793 he died, jurist - patriot - statesman, signer of the Bill of Rights, Articles of Confederation, Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States, first Mayor of New Haven, Treasurer of Yale College, and for twenty years a member of Congress -- Washington claimed his friendship and counsel, and was here his guest in 1789 -- to record his great service in the founding and early government of our country, this tablet is placed by the Connecticut society, Sons of the American Revolution, 1904."

The Roger Sherman Watch

"It was a primitive-looking silver watch, made in France in 1760, that belonged to Roger Sherman -- was in his fob when he stood with Jefferson, &c., before Hancock, reporting 'The Declaration of Independence.'"

The Theater of New England

"[A] prominent trait of his character -- to give the people what they want and demand. Mr. Bunnell's long training with P. T. Barnum has schooled him thoroughly in the art of amusement catering... This is the ninth year of his theatrical management in New Haven, and the years have been successions of triumphs. Mr. Bunnell... is fully equipped to supply the people with the amusements they want, for [he] so thoroughly understand[s] the wants of the New Haven public. The time will come, added Mr. Bunnell, when the Hyperion will be denominated 'The theater of New England.'"

Rebecca Prescott Sherman

"Roger Sherman journeyed on horseback from New Haven, where he had moved after his wife Elizabeth's death, to visit his brother Josiah, who was then settled over his church in Woburn, Massachusetts. Upon his departure, his brother accompanied him some little distance, when they stopped to say a few parting words. As they were bidding… Continue reading Rebecca Prescott Sherman