Cut of $5,500 Tablet Given S. Z. Poli on the Occasion of His 25th Anniversary.

"The Poli lobby and foyer will be opened to the public Sunday afternoon from 12 o'clock, closing at midnight. The occasion will be to give an opportunity to view the magnificent memorial tablet that was presented to S. Z. Poli by the citizens of New Haven, and others representing cities where he maintains playhouses, on the occasion of his twenty-fifth theatrical anniversary."

Rebuilt Brasserie Reopens, by Claudia Van Nes

"The Union League Cafe, a French brasserie in New Haven, has recovered from an unusual catastrophe to befall a restaurant and has reopened with a new kitchen and a refurbished dining room. The restaurant was the victim last Nov. 1 of a collapse of the roof of the historic Hyperion Theater, which crashed down on the back of the cafe, situated in the adjacent Roger Sherman building."

The Last Picture Shows, by Allen M. Widem

"THE DECISION by Loews Theaters, New York, to shut down the College Theater in downtown New Haven for the umpteenth time while determining the movie theater's future, points up the markedly winnowing away of what was once a firmly entrenched element in Connecticut entertainment — downtown motion picture theaters. With the closing of the College — its beginnings, as the then Hyperion Theater, go back to the late 19th century — downtown New Haven has only one motion picture theater playing conventional Hollywood product."

The Hyperion is Closed for the Summer to Undergo Remodeling

"Stuart Herschel, general manager of the Fox-New England circuit, has 16 houses under his direction. Two of them, the Elm in Worcester and the Hyperion in New Haven, are closed for the summer to undergo remodeling."

A Mad World and its Inhabitants, by Julius Chambers

"On Chapel street, as the carriages approached, the chimes in Trinity tower were playing 'My Country, 'Tis of Thee.' The instant the notes caught the President's ear he again rose and reverently stood uncovered until the ivy-clad church was passed. It was a graceful and evidently an impulsive act — an incident thoroughly Rooseveltian."

Booker T. Washington, A Guest of Honor

"Roosevelt looked calm and purposeful as he traveled through Connecticut on 23 October. The Secret Service, however, was noticeably apprehensive when he reached the Yale campus. In view of what had happened the last time a President had accepted public handshakes, he was forbidden to work the crowd. Shocked by this restriction, Roosevelt seemed to realize his personal and political danger for the first time. He averted his eyes from Washington during their march to Hyperion Theater. A revised security plan seated them far apart, with the Negro in the audience and Roosevelt himself on the stage. No reference to their dinner was made during the ensuing speeches. But cheers filled the hall when Supreme Court Justice David J. Brewer invoked the Father of the Nation and remarked, 'Thank God, there have always been in this country college men able to recognize a true Washington, though his first name be not George.'"

The Celebration of the Two Hundredth Anniversary of the Founding of Yale College, Held at Yale University, in New Haven, Connecticut, October the Twentieth to October the Twenty-Third, A. D. Nineteen Hundred and One

"President Theodore Roosevelt, who was the chief figure of the closing day of Yale's bicentennial celebrations, given an ovation as he receives his honorary degree. He pays a tribute to the sons of old Eli. 'I have never yet worked at a task worth doing that I did not find myself shoulder to shoulder with some son of Yale.'"

RODE ON A HANDCAR.

"New Haven was reached after the greatest handcar race on record. The big, brawny Irishmen worked the cranks like majors, and they got the $200 too. Miss Anderson said it was the most exciting ride she had ever experienced in all her travels around both hemispheres on all sorts of trains and vehicles."

MEMORIES OF A PLEASANT EVENING

"A great many people like to keep their program as a souvenir or reminder of a particularly enjoyable evening. Here is a space to jot a few little aids to pleasant memories of... MR. S. Z. POLI Presents THE HYPERION PLAYERS -IN- 'TRILBY' By George Du Maurier, Under the Direction of Bernard Steele, Ast. Director, Jerome Broderick."

NEW HYPERION MANAGER HERE

"Mr. Eldridge says the theaters of London and the customs of the people who attend them are far different from those in this country. The exterior of the English theater is much more prepossessing and the structures are among the most beautiful of the cities. Inside the American playhouse presents a better appearance. In addition to the costly decorations the lighting is much better in this country. In England the acting is done in the pit and the ladles and gentlemen in the stalls and the first balcony all have to wear evening clothes."