An American Empire style sofa made in New Haven about 1825, by Frances Phipps

"ALTHOUGH from the time of its founding in the 17th century, New Haven has always enjoyed a special sense of its own identity, for years no early furniture was known to exist that was signed or labeled as having been made there. Earlier this year, however, a sofa, designed in the American Empire style, was… Continue reading An American Empire style sofa made in New Haven about 1825, by Frances Phipps

The Connecticut Shore of the Sound, illustrated by William M. Gibson.

"Numerous converging and intersecting railways, extensive manufactures, and a considerable West-India commerce, contribute to the life and wealth of this beautiful city. Its suburbs are adorned with tasteful villas, and afford inviting drives and charming prospects. Of principal interest among its suburban attractions are the crags known as East and West Rocks — two bold and striking bluffs of trap-rock, lifting themselves, in magnificent array of opposition, about four hundred feet out of the plain which skirts the city. Their geological origin was probably some anomalous volcanic convulsion; and their grim heights may have sentinelled, in remote ages of our planet, the flow of the Connecticut River between their august feet to the Sound."

Blind date at the Union League Café.

"John said it was a pleasant evening, and she was a nice person, but he didn't get the impression that they were all that compatible with one another. Marilyn said they enjoyed each other's company, and she felt kind of in the middle, not either extreme, but it's too early to tell. John walked her back to her car, thanked her then shook her hand."

The Development of the Green as a Public Square, by Henry Taylor Blake

"As the city grows more dense and thronged around it, its use as a convenient spot for public buildings can no longer be thought of, but its priceless value as a breathing and resting and gathering place for the people becomes constantly more conspicuous. May it be guarded from enroachment in the future more jealously than in the past; and may our successors in its care of every race and lineage protect its soil, and cherish its traditions with that affectionate veneration which is the heritage and the test of every true son and daughter of New Haven!"

Elm City, by Herbert Randall

"A song-sparrow waited till late with its lay, then mingling, as sunshine and rain, his sweet vesper warble from birches and oak, fused thankfulness over the plain; the lashes of evening drooped over the blue; The lights from a train rumbled by; but day was at rest, as by mother-heart blest, a crescent-moon love-watching nigh. The picture returns like a vision from Faust, dissolves in the mem'ry of night."

The Last Picture Shows, by Allen M. Widem

"THE DECISION by Loews Theaters, New York, to shut down the College Theater in downtown New Haven for the umpteenth time while determining the movie theater's future, points up the markedly winnowing away of what was once a firmly entrenched element in Connecticut entertainment — downtown motion picture theaters. With the closing of the College — its beginnings, as the then Hyperion Theater, go back to the late 19th century — downtown New Haven has only one motion picture theater playing conventional Hollywood product."

The Landforms of Connecticut, by Joseph Bixby Hoyt

"The story you are beginning to read has two parts, the place and the people. Either part can be studied alone, but to produce the whole story of Connecticut they must be put together. The story began before any people lived there... Nevertheless, most of our story will be about the people..."

A Mad World and its Inhabitants, by Julius Chambers

"On Chapel street, as the carriages approached, the chimes in Trinity tower were playing 'My Country, 'Tis of Thee.' The instant the notes caught the President's ear he again rose and reverently stood uncovered until the ivy-clad church was passed. It was a graceful and evidently an impulsive act — an incident thoroughly Rooseveltian."

The Yale record: 1701 – 1901

"Bicentennial Notes: Souvenirs are for graduates only. To avoid others taking them, there will be no souvenirs. The animals will be fed at the University Dining Hall three times daily. Come and see them. They eat raw meet. No one but graduates are allowed to climb on the decorations or statues."

The Gown Laid Aside

"New Haven was never a boom town. It developed slowly, it grew steadily, not spasmodically. Conservatism became characteristic of it. Conservative it has remained until now. All though the nineteenth century, while steadily growing in strength and substance, it never outwardly startled the beholder. Those who really knew the city came to love it for its 'parts' rather than for ostentatious prosperity. It was a city of traditions and history, a city content to have intensive rather than extensive growth was the New Haven which woke on the mourn of its 264th year when it celebrated with Yale the completed two centuries."