This was Connecticut: images of a vanished world, by T. S. Bronson

"The great majority of photographs in this book are from the collection of the New Haven Colony Historical Society. But in order to give broader scope to this visual document of life in early Connecticut, other sources were used as well. These include the collection of Mrs. Edith LaFrancis (for all the striking photographs taken by George and Alvah Howes), the Sterling Memorial Library, Yale University (for selected scenes of life at early Yale)..."

Ascent of Agiocochook — Home of the Great Spirit.

"The first ascent of Mount Washington by a European settler, was by Darby Field, an Irish immigrant, who accomplished this difficult feat in 1642 from a southerly approach. Partly guided by Indians and with only primitive equipment at his disposal, he is thus alleged to be the originator of all Mount Washington ascensions."

An American Empire style sofa made in New Haven about 1825, by Frances Phipps

"ALTHOUGH from the time of its founding in the 17th century, New Haven has always enjoyed a special sense of its own identity, for years no early furniture was known to exist that was signed or labeled as having been made there. Earlier this year, however, a sofa, designed in the American Empire style, was… Continue reading An American Empire style sofa made in New Haven about 1825, by Frances Phipps

The Connecticut Shore of the Sound, illustrated by William M. Gibson.

"Numerous converging and intersecting railways, extensive manufactures, and a considerable West-India commerce, contribute to the life and wealth of this beautiful city. Its suburbs are adorned with tasteful villas, and afford inviting drives and charming prospects. Of principal interest among its suburban attractions are the crags known as East and West Rocks — two bold and striking bluffs of trap-rock, lifting themselves, in magnificent array of opposition, about four hundred feet out of the plain which skirts the city. Their geological origin was probably some anomalous volcanic convulsion; and their grim heights may have sentinelled, in remote ages of our planet, the flow of the Connecticut River between their august feet to the Sound."

The Development of the Green as a Public Square, by Henry Taylor Blake

"As the city grows more dense and thronged around it, its use as a convenient spot for public buildings can no longer be thought of, but its priceless value as a breathing and resting and gathering place for the people becomes constantly more conspicuous. May it be guarded from enroachment in the future more jealously than in the past; and may our successors in its care of every race and lineage protect its soil, and cherish its traditions with that affectionate veneration which is the heritage and the test of every true son and daughter of New Haven!"

Elm City, by Herbert Randall

"A song-sparrow waited till late with its lay, then mingling, as sunshine and rain, his sweet vesper warble from birches and oak, fused thankfulness over the plain; the lashes of evening drooped over the blue; The lights from a train rumbled by; but day was at rest, as by mother-heart blest, a crescent-moon love-watching nigh. The picture returns like a vision from Faust, dissolves in the mem'ry of night."

We revere thee, Rock, that long has stood.

"East Rock is a bold and beautiful promontory of almost fearful height, near the fine city of New Haven, Connecticut. It commands an extensive and delightful view of the town, the adjacent country to some extent, the bay, and Long Island itself, which resembles a huge confused mass of deep summer clouds, as viewed in the edge of the southern horizon apparently floating over the sound."

UNION LEAGUE CLUB. — House Rules.

"In complying with these rules we create harmony and good fellowship, and avoid infringing upon the rights and privileges of our fellow members. The Board of Governors of the Union League Club of New Haven, Conn."

The Thomas P. Merwin House, the William Bartlett House, and the Eighmie Patent Shirt

"Thomas P. Merwin, then one of the young dry goods merchants of the city, occupying the double store on Chapel street, adjoining the New Haven National bank, was married to Harriett A. Warner, daughter of Gaius F. Warner, the malleable iron manufacturer, by the Rev. William T. Eustis, pastor of that church, who was then one of the most popular preachers in the city. Four children have blessed that union, all of whom are living in this city to congratulate this couple upon fifty years of their happy married life. Mr. and Mrs. Merwin established their home on College street, enlarging the same from time to time as the growing family necessitated, where they still reside."

Cut of $5,500 Tablet Given S. Z. Poli on the Occasion of His 25th Anniversary.

"The Poli lobby and foyer will be opened to the public Sunday afternoon from 12 o'clock, closing at midnight. The occasion will be to give an opportunity to view the magnificent memorial tablet that was presented to S. Z. Poli by the citizens of New Haven, and others representing cities where he maintains playhouses, on the occasion of his twenty-fifth theatrical anniversary."