Fight of the Bon Homme Richard and the Serapis

"On September 23, 1779, Captain John Paul Jones fought a battle without parallel in naval history. Hitherto the contest upon the sea had been mainly a predatory warfare of privateers, aimed at the destruction of commerce and the plunder of merchant vessels. The young republic was without a navy proper. Called 'Pirate Jones' by the English, for retaliating on the coast of England for the atrocities committed on the coast of America, the captain of the Bon Homme Richard gallantly refused the sword of the surrending captain of the Serapis — but did take his ship."

UNION LEAGUE CLUB. — House Rules.

"In complying with these rules we create harmony and good fellowship, and avoid infringing upon the rights and privileges of our fellow members. The Board of Governors of the Union League Club of New Haven, Conn."

Historical Renovation, by Kenneth Boroson Architects

"Located in the historic Sherman Building, built in 1860, this New Haven landmark required a substantial renovation to expand its facility. Second floor offices were converted into a dining area and a new commercial kitchen. The project also included the replacement of a historic grand mahogany staircase leading from the wood paneled main dining room to the new grand ballroom on the second floor. High level carpentry and finish work was required to integrate the redesigned staircase and new ballroom additions into the existing old world millwork."

ROGER SHERMAN TABLET.

"Upon the site of this building stood the home of Roger Sherman, and near here in 1793 he died, jurist - patriot - statesman, signer of the Bill of Rights, Articles of Confederation, Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States, first Mayor of New Haven, Treasurer of Yale College, and for twenty years a member of Congress -- Washington claimed his friendship and counsel, and was here his guest in 1789 -- to record his great service in the founding and early government of our country, this tablet is placed by the Connecticut society, Sons of the American Revolution, 1904."

Noted men of Connecticut as published in the columns of The Evening Leader of New Haven, by Edward James Hall

"Hills, rocks and trees, the restless sea, the gleaming sands, in all does Connecticut rejoice, for they are hers and have been her choice possessions in enduring beauty since time began. But wonderfully as nature has endowed her, she is far better known as the land of invention, the home of shrewdness, sagacity and cleverness than through her charms of sea and land. To the people far away, the word Connecticut suggests the quality and calibre of her men, the length and breadth of their achievements..."

UNION LEAGUE CLUB. Corner Stone Laid with Fitting Ceremonies Yesterday.

"The corner stone of the addition which is being built by the Union league on Chapel street was laid with fitting exercises at 4:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon. Professor W. E. Chandler, treasurer of the club, presented the trowel in a few fitting remarks to President George B. Martin, who, after a few appropriate words, laid the stone."

The Yacht Club Concert

"As some of the happiest events that the New Haven Yacht club have thus far celebrated were from their very nature of a nautical character, it seemed perfectly proper that there should be a watery manifestation of the elements last evening at their first concert... A tempting collation was served, Caterer Bradley, assisted by Head Waiter Pickett, officiating. Many of the members of the [Republican] league were present, also Governor Harrison and Thomas R. Trowbridge, jr., president of the league, to whom the visitors were introduced, after which they spent a few hours in a very social manner, playing billiards, whist and in conversation, and every visitor present expressed themselves as highly pleased with the attention shown them by the members of the Yacht club."

Bunnell Takes It.

"G. B. Bunnell, who has been known as the successful manager of dime museums, has leased Carll's opera house at New Haven, and announces that he shall produce first class plays, opera, etc., and more than maintain its reputation. He wants it distinctly understood that the management has nothing whatever in connection with the museum... George B. Bunnell takes control of Carll's Opera House on May 1, and from that time it will be known as the Hyperion."

The Republican League Purchases the Club House on Chapel Street

"Yesterday a very important purchase of property was made, being the purchase of the club house of the Republican league by its members, the consideration being $25,000... Dr. Winchell will convey to the club a clean title of the property -- which was formerly occupied as a family residence by Marshal Carll, and previous to that by the late Gaius F. Warner, and which is situated in front of the Hyperion Theater."