Fight of the Bon Homme Richard and the Serapis

"On September 23, 1779, Captain John Paul Jones fought a battle without parallel in naval history. Hitherto the contest upon the sea had been mainly a predatory warfare of privateers, aimed at the destruction of commerce and the plunder of merchant vessels. The young republic was without a navy proper. Called 'Pirate Jones' by the English, for retaliating on the coast of England for the atrocities committed on the coast of America, the captain of the Bon Homme Richard gallantly refused the sword of the surrending captain of the Serapis — but did take his ship."

Old Campus night owls acquire gate-climbing skills, by Meredith Hobbs

"The first time you climb High Street Gate marks a new phase of your life at Yale that can be most accurately described as the 'late-night phase.' Yale Police lock the gate at 12:30 a.m. on weeknights, which seals off all access to Old Campus except for Phelps Gate, directly across the Green."

This was Connecticut: images of a vanished world, by T. S. Bronson

"The great majority of photographs in this book are from the collection of the New Haven Colony Historical Society. But in order to give broader scope to this visual document of life in early Connecticut, other sources were used as well. These include the collection of Mrs. Edith LaFrancis (for all the striking photographs taken by George and Alvah Howes), the Sterling Memorial Library, Yale University (for selected scenes of life at early Yale)..."

Ascent of Agiocochook — Home of the Great Spirit.

"The first ascent of Mount Washington by a European settler, was by Darby Field, an Irish immigrant, who accomplished this difficult feat in 1642 from a southerly approach. Partly guided by Indians and with only primitive equipment at his disposal, he is thus alleged to be the originator of all Mount Washington ascensions."

Interpreting the Rocks of New Haven, by William Zimmer

"The exhibit was organized by Linda Lindroth, a New Haven photographer and assistant professor at Quinnipiac College, who lives across the street from East Rock. 'This exhibition is the product of a search for new spaces and new relationships within the city to show artwork,' says Lindroth, noting that it is the first time that the historical society has hosted an exhibit by living photographers. In an essay in the exhibition catalogue, Amy L. Trout, curator at the New Haven Colony Historical Society, writes, 'More than geographical features, East and West Rocks are symbols of New Haven. As such, they carry meaning beyond what their physical presence implies.' The Rocks have served as a 'backdrop' in artworks documenting the changes in New Haven over the years, she notes."

The Connecticut Shore of the Sound, illustrated by William M. Gibson.

"Numerous converging and intersecting railways, extensive manufactures, and a considerable West-India commerce, contribute to the life and wealth of this beautiful city. Its suburbs are adorned with tasteful villas, and afford inviting drives and charming prospects. Of principal interest among its suburban attractions are the crags known as East and West Rocks — two bold and striking bluffs of trap-rock, lifting themselves, in magnificent array of opposition, about four hundred feet out of the plain which skirts the city. Their geological origin was probably some anomalous volcanic convulsion; and their grim heights may have sentinelled, in remote ages of our planet, the flow of the Connecticut River between their august feet to the Sound."

Anna W. Dickinson is Married in Illinois to Richard B. Platt

"The bride was presented at the Passavant Cotillion in 1967. The bridegroom is a descendant of Richard Platt, who helped found the New Haven Colony in 1637."

Blind date at the Union League Café.

"John said it was a pleasant evening, and she was a nice person, but he didn't get the impression that they were all that compatible with one another. Marilyn said they enjoyed each other's company, and she felt kind of in the middle, not either extreme, but it's too early to tell. John walked her back to her car, thanked her then shook her hand."

Elm City, by Herbert Randall

"A song-sparrow waited till late with its lay, then mingling, as sunshine and rain, his sweet vesper warble from birches and oak, fused thankfulness over the plain; the lashes of evening drooped over the blue; The lights from a train rumbled by; but day was at rest, as by mother-heart blest, a crescent-moon love-watching nigh. The picture returns like a vision from Faust, dissolves in the mem'ry of night."

The Landforms of Connecticut, by Joseph Bixby Hoyt

"The story you are beginning to read has two parts, the place and the people. Either part can be studied alone, but to produce the whole story of Connecticut they must be put together. The story began before any people lived there... Nevertheless, most of our story will be about the people..."