Dr. Robert Farris Thompson Remembers the Spirit of Basquiat, by Sotheby’s

"Jean-Michel's paintings contain spiraling active forces, and these forces are a constant. One force is script. Nothing makes him more righteously angry than to get this question, 'Tell me about your graffiti.' What Jean-Michel did was not graffiti. There were statements, there were epigrams, and he wanted you to see them so he wrote it out always in capital letters. That is one current always flowing."

Cutting the Transcultural Rug: An Evening with Robert Farris Thompson, by Alan Lockwood

"'One night, it was almost closing time and a dude grabbed the conga then started chanting: ‘Aguacero de mayo [‘May showers’].’ I wrote: ‘Perhaps this has reference to the religions in Cuba.’ Cut thirty years to 1985: I’ve been assigned to interview Toni Morrison, who said, ‘My mama said you should jump out in the first showers in May’—and I froze. Lydia Cabrera, the queen of Afro-Cuban anthropology, wrote: When you prepare the prenda, the Kongo charm, one ingredient may be rain from the first showers in May; it comes direct from God.'"

Rap Music, Brash And Swaggering, Enters Mainstream, by Glenn Collins

"'Rap has really begun to get around the mainstream culture,' said Robert Farris Thompson, a professor of African and Afro-American art history at Yale University. Hip-hop words from what was once an underclass subculture are now common parlance among America's youth. 'Rappers are persons of words, and those words are getting into the language,' said Professor Thompson."

The only handwritten draft of the Bill of Rights, by Roger Sherman

"A handwritten working draft of the Bill of Rights — the only such document known to exist — has been found and identified in the most likely of places: the Library of Congress. This early draft was written by Representative Roger Sherman of Connecticut on an unknown date in July 1789 while the first Congress was meeting in New York. Sherman, a longtime judge of the Connecticut Superior Court who became a Senator in 1791, served with Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin on the committee that drafted the Declaration of Independence. He was the only framer to sign all three original founding documents — the Declaration, the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution."

An Ethnic History of New Haven: Pre-1938

"The first people to live in New Haven were Native Americans. Native Americans lived in New Haven as long as 8,000 years ago! The earliest people we know about that lived in New Haven were members of the Quinnipiac Tribe. They lived in villages around the harbor and caught fish and raised maize (a kind of corn)."

Booker T. Washington, A Guest of Honor

"Roosevelt looked calm and purposeful as he traveled through Connecticut on 23 October. The Secret Service, however, was noticeably apprehensive when he reached the Yale campus. In view of what had happened the last time a President had accepted public handshakes, he was forbidden to work the crowd. Shocked by this restriction, Roosevelt seemed to realize his personal and political danger for the first time. He averted his eyes from Washington during their march to Hyperion Theater. A revised security plan seated them far apart, with the Negro in the audience and Roosevelt himself on the stage. No reference to their dinner was made during the ensuing speeches. But cheers filled the hall when Supreme Court Justice David J. Brewer invoked the Father of the Nation and remarked, 'Thank God, there have always been in this country college men able to recognize a true Washington, though his first name be not George.'"

Red Cloud Visits a Friend.; The Great Indian Chief the Guest of Prof. Marsh in New-Haven.

"Red Cloud, the Sioux chief, is in New-Haven, the guest of his friend, Prof. O. C. Marsh of Yale College. Their acquaintance began in 1874, when the Professor, with an exploring party, was searching near the Black Hills for fossil specimens. The Indians were hostile, believing the explorers were after gold, but the Professor succeeded not only in placating Red Cloud, their chief, but in making him his warm friend, and now obtains his presence here that he may show him the fossils he obtained."

Women of Yale, by Harriet H. Coffin

"For the first time in its long male history, Yale College last month graduated women — 182 in a class of 1,132. Called superwomen when first admitted two years ago as transfer students, they have frequently scored higher academically than their male classmates. But they don't feel like superwomen. The job market is even leaner for them than for their male classmates; and their two years at Yale have been rougher than expected."

Yale History Made By Freshman Girl

"It was about 12:05 p.m. in Connecticut Hall on the Old Campus quadrangle, when registrations lines opened for the 1,255 freshmen of the Class of 1973, the first Yale undergraduate class with women... The freshmen co-eds will all be housed in Vanderbilt Hall."

The Wide-Awakes of Connecticut: A Most Remarkable Scene

"The successful presidential campaign of Republican Abraham Lincoln perfected the nighttime torchlight parade as an entertainment of unprecedented scale that attracted the attention of men, women, and children. The concept originated in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1858, and was revived for Lincoln’s campaign by the city’s young Republicans. Tailored oil-resistant enameled cloth capes distinguished the marchers, some of whom were too young to vote. Their example spread from Hartford to cities in the northeastern United States, which contributed traveling companies totaling some ten thousand uniformed men with torches to a Grand Procession in New York City on October 3, 1860."