Good Food at The Place, by Gloria and Jacques Pepin

"'There is no place just like this place anywhere near this place. For this must be The Place.' So said the sign on 'Whitey's restaurant' years ago. The sign is still there but now Whitey's is called The Place. It looks like a private outdoor party or a friendly country fair, convivial and joyous, relaxed, lots of fun, but it isn't private. It is a roadside restaurant, or rather an outdoor roast restaurant."

The Southernmost Holding of New Haven Colony

"MOST New Yorkers have doubtless forgotten it, but until a little more than three centuries ago the town of Southold, L.I., was the southernmost holding of New Haven Colony. It was bitter loss to New Haven when Southold was written out of the Royal Charter. The people of New Haven stewed for three years before they finally accepted the charter in 1665, without the property on Long Island. The people of Southold resisted the change for many years longer, petitioning the King to be left as part of Connecticut, and refusing to pay New York taxes."

The Connecticut Shore of the Sound, illustrated by William M. Gibson.

"Numerous converging and intersecting railways, extensive manufactures, and a considerable West-India commerce, contribute to the life and wealth of this beautiful city. Its suburbs are adorned with tasteful villas, and afford inviting drives and charming prospects. Of principal interest among its suburban attractions are the crags known as East and West Rocks — two bold and striking bluffs of trap-rock, lifting themselves, in magnificent array of opposition, about four hundred feet out of the plain which skirts the city. Their geological origin was probably some anomalous volcanic convulsion; and their grim heights may have sentinelled, in remote ages of our planet, the flow of the Connecticut River between their august feet to the Sound."

The Gown Laid Aside

"New Haven was never a boom town. It developed slowly, it grew steadily, not spasmodically. Conservatism became characteristic of it. Conservative it has remained until now. All though the nineteenth century, while steadily growing in strength and substance, it never outwardly startled the beholder. Those who really knew the city came to love it for its 'parts' rather than for ostentatious prosperity. It was a city of traditions and history, a city content to have intensive rather than extensive growth was the New Haven which woke on the mourn of its 264th year when it celebrated with Yale the completed two centuries."

I’ll See You in Court, by Michelle Chihara

"On the second floor, above the Union League Cafe on Chapel Street, downtown New Haven merchants from the College-Chapel area mingle over wine and cheese. Behind them hang photographs and paintings of New Haven. White Christmas lights, twined into a large wreath and two small Christmas trees, reflect in the floor-to-ceiling windows facing onto the… Continue reading I’ll See You in Court, by Michelle Chihara