A heritage collection of United States stamps commemorating the Bicentennial, by the U. S. Postal Service, 1976

"The 'Spirit of 76.' It has endured for two hundred years. It was there — unformed and unnamed — the night disguised patriots threw chests of British-taxed tea into Boston Harbor. It became a fearful reality as rebel drum beats summoned Minutemen to Lexington Green. It was proudly declared in that summer of 1776, when men signed their names to a document that began,'When, in the course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another...' It was formally conceded by the British five years later, on the fields of Yorktown, as the American, General Lincoln, received the sword of defeated Cornwallis. Many fought to keep that spirit alive. Young, old, famous, unknown. Benjamin Franklin was 70 the year he signed the Declaration of Independence."

The New Haven Cadets, 1775

"Very early the next morning, General George Washington reviewed the local troops on the Green and set out to continue their journey, escorted as far as the historic 'Neck Bridge' by the Second Company of the Governor's Guard, another uniformed company and the company that had been recruited from the students of Yale College, and accompanied by a great number of the inhabitants of the town. Noah Webster, heading the procession with his fife, or to use his own words, 'It fell to my humble lot to lead this company with music.'"

The Theater of New England

"[A] prominent trait of his character -- to give the people what they want and demand. Mr. Bunnell's long training with P. T. Barnum has schooled him thoroughly in the art of amusement catering... This is the ninth year of his theatrical management in New Haven, and the years have been successions of triumphs. Mr. Bunnell... is fully equipped to supply the people with the amusements they want, for [he] so thoroughly understand[s] the wants of the New Haven public. The time will come, added Mr. Bunnell, when the Hyperion will be denominated 'The theater of New England.'"