A heritage collection of United States stamps commemorating the Bicentennial, by the U. S. Postal Service, 1976

"The 'Spirit of 76.' It has endured for two hundred years. It was there — unformed and unnamed — the night disguised patriots threw chests of British-taxed tea into Boston Harbor. It became a fearful reality as rebel drum beats summoned Minutemen to Lexington Green. It was proudly declared in that summer of 1776, when men signed their names to a document that began,'When, in the course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another...' It was formally conceded by the British five years later, on the fields of Yorktown, as the American, General Lincoln, received the sword of defeated Cornwallis. Many fought to keep that spirit alive. Young, old, famous, unknown. Benjamin Franklin was 70 the year he signed the Declaration of Independence."

The Yale man Up-to-Date, by Jean Pardee, 1894

"The Yale man, from the primeval days of the College up to the present time... has waxed so much more important, so much more interesting in these last few years... Yea, verily, he is a creature of fads and fancies, yet not, as a rule, feminine... He is not, however, the absolutely independent creature he was in the good old days of life-at-Yale."

The New Haven Cadets, 1775

"Very early the next morning, General George Washington reviewed the local troops on the Green and set out to continue their journey, escorted as far as the historic 'Neck Bridge' by the Second Company of the Governor's Guard, another uniformed company and the company that had been recruited from the students of Yale College, and accompanied by a great number of the inhabitants of the town. Noah Webster, heading the procession with his fife, or to use his own words, 'It fell to my humble lot to lead this company with music.'"

Petey Dink: 1918 Influenza Pandemic Comic Strips, by H. A. Voight

"Help Fight The Grip. — How Not To Get It: Get fresh air and sunshine. Avoid crowded places, especially cars. Keep away from sneezers and coughers. Don't visit people!!! with colds. Keep your mouth and teeth clean. Protect the body by proper clothing. Avoid exposure by sudden changes. Avoid worry and and fatigue. How Not to Give It: Stay at home on the first indication of a cold. Don't receive visitors while sick or recovering. Don't leave your home until all symptoms have gone. Don't sneeze, spit or cough in public places. Don't hesitate to complain against careless spitters and coughers. — The State Department of Health and the Connecticut State Council of Defense urge you to DO YOUR BIT TO STOP THE GRIP."

Signs of the Time, by Sarah Laskow

"The history of these signs begins at the corner of College and Chapel, the city's heart. Here, New Haven thrives. Yale's faux-Gothic buildings share sidewalks with the brand name stores that feed off the University's economic power. The New Haven Green and the locally famous Claire's Corner Copia bustle with activity. At the corner, a name famous not only in New Haven, but around the world, presides over the downtown landscape — Bishop Desmond Tutu."

Dr. Robert Farris Thompson Remembers the Spirit of Basquiat, by Sotheby’s

"Jean-Michel's paintings contain spiraling active forces, and these forces are a constant. One force is script. Nothing makes him more righteously angry than to get this question, 'Tell me about your graffiti.' What Jean-Michel did was not graffiti. There were statements, there were epigrams, and he wanted you to see them so he wrote it out always in capital letters. That is one current always flowing."

Cutting the Transcultural Rug: An Evening with Robert Farris Thompson, by Alan Lockwood

"'One night, it was almost closing time and a dude grabbed the conga then started chanting: ‘Aguacero de mayo [‘May showers’].’ I wrote: ‘Perhaps this has reference to the religions in Cuba.’ Cut thirty years to 1985: I’ve been assigned to interview Toni Morrison, who said, ‘My mama said you should jump out in the first showers in May’—and I froze. Lydia Cabrera, the queen of Afro-Cuban anthropology, wrote: When you prepare the prenda, the Kongo charm, one ingredient may be rain from the first showers in May; it comes direct from God.'"

Tango: Acknowledgements, by Robert Farris Thompson

"Parts of these chapters were written on the tables of Jean Michel Gamme and Jean-Pierre Vuillermet's Union League Cafe in New Haven. I was equally welcome to write at Caffe Adulis, where the three Eritrean brother-owners — Sahle, Fiere, and Gideon Ghebreyesus — even went so far as to twist dials to cast extra light on my table. Similar courtesies were extended by Jeff Horton at Scoozie's Restaurant and John Clark at Zinc. All of these restaurants are in New Haven."

Rap Music, Brash And Swaggering, Enters Mainstream, by Glenn Collins

"'Rap has really begun to get around the mainstream culture,' said Robert Farris Thompson, a professor of African and Afro-American art history at Yale University. Hip-hop words from what was once an underclass subculture are now common parlance among America's youth. 'Rappers are persons of words, and those words are getting into the language,' said Professor Thompson."

Undergraduate Life at Yale, by Henry E. Howland, with illustrations by Orson Lowell

"The atmosphere of a university is the subtle creation of its history, traditions, and surroundings, and is an element as vital as its more tangible properties. If, as Syrus says, 'Discipulus est priori posterior dies,' antiquity is a factor in its influence which neither wealth nor equipment nor even a high order of instruction can supersede. If we wish to take a true estimate of the genius of the institution, we must consider the character of the men who attended its birth and impressed themselves upon its youth, the molding force of the events through which it has passed, and the ideals toward which it has always striven."