Rap Music, Brash And Swaggering, Enters Mainstream, by Glenn Collins

"'Rap has really begun to get around the mainstream culture,' said Robert Farris Thompson, a professor of African and Afro-American art history at Yale University. Hip-hop words from what was once an underclass subculture are now common parlance among America's youth. 'Rappers are persons of words, and those words are getting into the language,' said Professor Thompson."

The Southernmost Holding of New Haven Colony

"MOST New Yorkers have doubtless forgotten it, but until a little more than three centuries ago the town of Southold, L.I., was the southernmost holding of New Haven Colony. It was bitter loss to New Haven when Southold was written out of the Royal Charter. The people of New Haven stewed for three years before they finally accepted the charter in 1665, without the property on Long Island. The people of Southold resisted the change for many years longer, petitioning the King to be left as part of Connecticut, and refusing to pay New York taxes."

An American Empire style sofa made in New Haven about 1825, by Frances Phipps

"ALTHOUGH from the time of its founding in the 17th century, New Haven has always enjoyed a special sense of its own identity, for years no early furniture was known to exist that was signed or labeled as having been made there. Earlier this year, however, a sofa, designed in the American Empire style, was… Continue reading An American Empire style sofa made in New Haven about 1825, by Frances Phipps

Interpreting the Rocks of New Haven, by William Zimmer

"The exhibit was organized by Linda Lindroth, a New Haven photographer and assistant professor at Quinnipiac College, who lives across the street from East Rock. 'This exhibition is the product of a search for new spaces and new relationships within the city to show artwork,' says Lindroth, noting that it is the first time that the historical society has hosted an exhibit by living photographers. In an essay in the exhibition catalogue, Amy L. Trout, curator at the New Haven Colony Historical Society, writes, 'More than geographical features, East and West Rocks are symbols of New Haven. As such, they carry meaning beyond what their physical presence implies.' The Rocks have served as a 'backdrop' in artworks documenting the changes in New Haven over the years, she notes."

Rebuilt Brasserie Reopens, by Claudia Van Nes

"The Union League Cafe, a French brasserie in New Haven, has recovered from an unusual catastrophe to befall a restaurant and has reopened with a new kitchen and a refurbished dining room. The restaurant was the victim last Nov. 1 of a collapse of the roof of the historic Hyperion Theater, which crashed down on the back of the cafe, situated in the adjacent Roger Sherman building."

The Last Picture Shows, by Allen M. Widem

"THE DECISION by Loews Theaters, New York, to shut down the College Theater in downtown New Haven for the umpteenth time while determining the movie theater's future, points up the markedly winnowing away of what was once a firmly entrenched element in Connecticut entertainment — downtown motion picture theaters. With the closing of the College — its beginnings, as the then Hyperion Theater, go back to the late 19th century — downtown New Haven has only one motion picture theater playing conventional Hollywood product."

Vanderbilt Hall at Yale — Gift of Cornelius Vanderbilt in Memory of His Son.

"Ground was broken for the new Vanderbilt dormitory early in June, and, since the first sod was turned, the obstacles in the way of the erection of the building have been speedily torn away and the foundations laid for the most expensive dormitory in the United States."

Romantic Rendezvous for Spring, by Stephanie Lyness

"Tables, covered with butcher paper in traditional brasserie fashion, are comfortably spaced for privacy, and banquettes invite discreet cuddling. The service is appropriately reserved but not stiff, and the room is lively but contained."

The Wide-Awakes of Connecticut: A Most Remarkable Scene

"The successful presidential campaign of Republican Abraham Lincoln perfected the nighttime torchlight parade as an entertainment of unprecedented scale that attracted the attention of men, women, and children. The concept originated in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1858, and was revived for Lincoln’s campaign by the city’s young Republicans. Tailored oil-resistant enameled cloth capes distinguished the marchers, some of whom were too young to vote. Their example spread from Hartford to cities in the northeastern United States, which contributed traveling companies totaling some ten thousand uniformed men with torches to a Grand Procession in New York City on October 3, 1860."

Portrait of a Vanishing Landscape, by Jonathan Turner

"A Connecticut-based photographer will present the culmination of 13 years of visits to Iowa in his first book, 'Iowa: Echoes of a Vanishing Landscape,' at 1:30 p.m. Saturday, at the Davenport Public Library's Eastern Avenue Branch. David Ottenstein, 57, traveled tens of thousands of miles and produced roughly 50,000 photographs, choosing 89 black-and-white portraits of… Continue reading Portrait of a Vanishing Landscape, by Jonathan Turner