Undergraduate Life at Yale, by Henry E. Howland, with illustrations by Orson Lowell

"The atmosphere of a university is the subtle creation of its history, traditions, and surroundings, and is an element as vital as its more tangible properties. If, as Syrus says, 'Discipulus est priori posterior dies,' antiquity is a factor in its influence which neither wealth nor equipment nor even a high order of instruction can supersede. If we wish to take a true estimate of the genius of the institution, we must consider the character of the men who attended its birth and impressed themselves upon its youth, the molding force of the events through which it has passed, and the ideals toward which it has always striven."

The Connecticut Shore of the Sound, illustrated by William M. Gibson.

"Numerous converging and intersecting railways, extensive manufactures, and a considerable West-India commerce, contribute to the life and wealth of this beautiful city. Its suburbs are adorned with tasteful villas, and afford inviting drives and charming prospects. Of principal interest among its suburban attractions are the crags known as East and West Rocks — two bold and striking bluffs of trap-rock, lifting themselves, in magnificent array of opposition, about four hundred feet out of the plain which skirts the city. Their geological origin was probably some anomalous volcanic convulsion; and their grim heights may have sentinelled, in remote ages of our planet, the flow of the Connecticut River between their august feet to the Sound."

ROGER SHERMAN TABLET.

"Upon the site of this building stood the home of Roger Sherman, and near here in 1793 he died, jurist - patriot - statesman, signer of the Bill of Rights, Articles of Confederation, Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States, first Mayor of New Haven, Treasurer of Yale College, and for twenty years a member of Congress -- Washington claimed his friendship and counsel, and was here his guest in 1789 -- to record his great service in the founding and early government of our country, this tablet is placed by the Connecticut society, Sons of the American Revolution, 1904."

A Mad World and its Inhabitants, by Julius Chambers

"On Chapel street, as the carriages approached, the chimes in Trinity tower were playing 'My Country, 'Tis of Thee.' The instant the notes caught the President's ear he again rose and reverently stood uncovered until the ivy-clad church was passed. It was a graceful and evidently an impulsive act — an incident thoroughly Rooseveltian."

The Yale record: 1701 – 1901

"Bicentennial Notes: Souvenirs are for graduates only. To avoid others taking them, there will be no souvenirs. The animals will be fed at the University Dining Hall three times daily. Come and see them. They eat raw meet. No one but graduates are allowed to climb on the decorations or statues."

The Gown Laid Aside

"New Haven was never a boom town. It developed slowly, it grew steadily, not spasmodically. Conservatism became characteristic of it. Conservative it has remained until now. All though the nineteenth century, while steadily growing in strength and substance, it never outwardly startled the beholder. Those who really knew the city came to love it for its 'parts' rather than for ostentatious prosperity. It was a city of traditions and history, a city content to have intensive rather than extensive growth was the New Haven which woke on the mourn of its 264th year when it celebrated with Yale the completed two centuries."

A Connecticut Yankee at Yale, by Wilbur L. Cross

"I had but to walk over to Carll’s Opera House, where in one season or another I might see the great contemporary actors: Booth and Barrett, Irving and Terry, Modjeska or Bernhardt, or Joe Jefferson (a favorite of the students). It may have been in New York that I first saw the elder Salvini in the role of Othello. Was it then or later that Gilbert and Sullivan’s operas came to town? I thank God that the visual age was in the far distance when novels and plays were to be washed out with pictures on a screen."

National Carriage Builders Convention, Carll’s Opera House, New Haven, Connecticut. October 18th and 19th, 1883

"While the National Carriage Builders' association were dining in Carll's opera house to-night, shortly after 11 o'clock, and one of the curtains in the parquette caught fire, creating a panic. Senator Platt was addressing the audience when the fire blazed up. Some cool-headed persons shouted, 'Sit down, there's no danger!' The band struck up 'Yankee Doodle' and the fire was soon extinguished. It was caused by a man striking a light for his cigar. There were about seven hundred persons in the theater at the time."

Red Cloud Visits a Friend.; The Great Indian Chief the Guest of Prof. Marsh in New-Haven.

"Red Cloud, the Sioux chief, is in New-Haven, the guest of his friend, Prof. O. C. Marsh of Yale College. Their acquaintance began in 1874, when the Professor, with an exploring party, was searching near the Black Hills for fossil specimens. The Indians were hostile, believing the explorers were after gold, but the Professor succeeded not only in placating Red Cloud, their chief, but in making him his warm friend, and now obtains his presence here that he may show him the fossils he obtained."

Vanderbilt Hall at Yale — Gift of Cornelius Vanderbilt in Memory of His Son.

"Ground was broken for the new Vanderbilt dormitory early in June, and, since the first sod was turned, the obstacles in the way of the erection of the building have been speedily torn away and the foundations laid for the most expensive dormitory in the United States."