MAY KING’S PROPHECY, by Allen Ginsberg, May 1, 1970

"Prior to the reading, Allen explained how he was tear-gassed in New Haven last week while attending the weekend rally in support of Black Panther Bobby Seale. Ginsberg said he used breathing exercises rendering the tear gas ineffective against him."

REMARKS AT NEW HAVEN GREEN, by President John Fitzgerald Kennedy, October 17, 1962

"America is moving again — so are Connecticut and New Haven. But to help keep them moving, I need your help in this election. For much more remains to be done. Too many problems are still ahead. Too many measures for the good of this country have been defeated by a narrow margin."

FLAMES SPREAD QUICKLY; Survivor Says Many in Front Seats Couldn’t Have Escaped, November 28, 1921

"I do not know what caused the fire. A woman had just finished singing on the stage and the film was being shown. I saw a little smoke and a light which I thought had something to do with the production. Then I saw a piece of blazing material fall from the top of the stage. It was small, but it was followed by a burst of fire."

IN A NEW HAVEN GARAGE, NEON ART GLOWS, by Andi Rierden, October 8, 1989

"'This garage is the inside of my brain,' said Mundy Hepburn, gliding his arm through the air. Standing in the bed of a Chevy pickup, his frame backlighted by one of his neon sculptures, 'The Wave,' he described with reverence the 'mystical beauty' of neon."

OUR BEEF WITH TEXAS, by Andy Horowitz, January 28, 2007

"Let us not stop defending our city’s history. Let us not stop boasting of Eli Whitney and his cotton gin, of A. C. Gilbert and his Erector Set, or of how Buffalo Bill Cody carried a Winchester rifle, built with pride in New Haven. Let us not even stop boasting about how New Haven native Charles Goodyear invented the rubber tire, even though it was by accident."

THE TAFT HOTEL, NEW HAVEN, CONN., by F. M. Andrews and Company Architects, April 1912

"The Hotel Taft contains about three hundred guest bedrooms, each connected with a bath, arranged singly or in suites of three to five rooms. The building has extensive public accommodations, including regular dining rooms, private dining rooms, a banquet hall, roof garden and accommodation for small society dinners."

OLD SEAPORT TOWN OF NEW HAVEN, by Hildegarde Hawthorne, 1916

"We found that the ideal way to spend the evening in New Haven was to sit out on the Green. There were other things to do, of course, and we noted that moving pictures appeared to be patronized here as elsewhere. But it was the Green for us, and for many more. The fragrant June night had collected a few early fireflies, and was tossing them idly about over the grass, as an Egyptian queen might play with diamonds. The chimes from Trinity sounded, very sweet. Young lovers passed, arm linked close in arm, head to head. A buzzing of motor cars gave the emphasis of a city to the country vision of shadowy trees and open grassy spaces."

THE TOUR OF GENERAL WASHINGTON IN 1789, by Katharine M. Abbott

"The Road for the greater part, indeed the whole way, was very rough and stoney, but the Land strong... The City of New Haven occupies a good deal of ground, but is thinly, though regularly laid out and built. The number of Souls in it are said to be about 4000. There is an Episcopal Church, three Congregational Meeting Houses, and a College, in which are at this time about 120 Students under Auspices of Doctor Styles [Ezra Stiles]."

THE YALE MAN UP-TO-DATE, by Jean Pardee, 1894

"The Yale man, from the primeval days of the College up to the present time... has waxed so much more important, so much more interesting in these last few years... Yea, verily, he is a creature of fads and fancies, yet not, as a rule, feminine... He is not, however, the absolutely independent creature he was in the good old days of life-at-Yale."

The First Engraving, 1775

"The primary cause of the first regular engraving being performed in New Haven appears to have been the battle or action at Lexington. When the news of this affair reached New Haven, Arnold, as has been stated, started with about forty volunteers. Among this number were Mr. Amos Doolittle, and a Mr. Earl, a portrait painter. These young men were, no doubt, powerfully excited by what they saw and heard at the scene of action, and on their return to New Haven endeavored to show to their excited countrymen pictorially the opening scenes of the great contest which had now fully begun."