Fight of the Bon Homme Richard and the Serapis

"On September 23, 1779, Captain John Paul Jones fought a battle without parallel in naval history. Hitherto the contest upon the sea had been mainly a predatory warfare of privateers, aimed at the destruction of commerce and the plunder of merchant vessels. The young republic was without a navy proper. Called 'Pirate Jones' by the English, for retaliating on the coast of England for the atrocities committed on the coast of America, the captain of the Bon Homme Richard gallantly refused the sword of the surrending captain of the Serapis — but did take his ship."

National Archives, Founders Online: To John Adams from Roger Sherman, 20 July 1789

"If the President alone was vested with the power of appointing all officers, and was left to select a council for himself he would be liable to be deceived by flatterers and pretenders to Patriotism, who would have no motive but their own emolument. They would wish to extend the powers of the executive to increase their own importance, and however upright he might be in his intentions, there would be great danger of his being misled, even to the subversion of the constitution, or at least to introduce such evils as to interrupt the harmony of the government & deprive him of the confidence of the people. "

They Gave Us Liberty: Roger Sherman, by Ellsworth S. Grant

"This archetype of the Connecticut Yankee had a reputation for taciturnity. One of his political mottoes was: 'When you are in a minority, talk, when you are in a majority, vote!' In his country drawl, daughter came out as 'dat-ter' and applesauce sounded like 'ap-plesass.' But Jefferson remarked that however awkward his manner Sherman 'never said a foolish thing in his life.' And he was by no means silent. During the Convention he spoke 138 times, each speech short but pithy, only three others were more vocal."

[The Shermans] Have Ruled America, by Dr. B. J. Cigrand

"The Sherman people have been earnest supporters of the Union: from the famous Roger down we find them loyally upholding the principles of their distinguished forefathers. In the village boards, the aldermanic councils, the list of mayors, the roll of Governors, the roster of Generals, and roll-call of House and Senate, the name Sherman is ever present."

Interesting Historical Paper Read by Judge Baldwin Last Night.

"[Roger] Sherman's parents were English people of the lower class and he can be said to have sprung from what is described as the common people. He had not the same confidence in the people that they reposed in him. He was an effective speaker whose power of debate lay in his never taking the floor unless he had something new to offer. Justice was his great forte and he was a lover of the truth."