This was Connecticut: images of a vanished world, by T. S. Bronson

"The great majority of photographs in this book are from the collection of the New Haven Colony Historical Society. But in order to give broader scope to this visual document of life in early Connecticut, other sources were used as well. These include the collection of Mrs. Edith LaFrancis (for all the striking photographs taken by George and Alvah Howes), the Sterling Memorial Library, Yale University (for selected scenes of life at early Yale)..."

YALE DECORATIONS. FESTOONS OF BUNTING, IMPORTED LANTERNS.

"The general effect of this decoration will be of two lines of festoons from Phelps hall, which will be the main entrance to the campus during the bi-centennial, extending to Osborn Hall on the south and Battell Chapel on the north. The electrical illumination will be concentrated at Phelps Hall, about 700 electric lights outlining the horizontal and vertical lines of the building. A Union Jack, with 45 stars on a blue background, will surmount the battlements of the building. Across its front will be stretched an emblematic shield, eight by twelve feet in dimensions, its frame work decorated with flags and streamers."

New Haven in 1887, by Walter Allen

"The east wall of the Mix house, according to measurements of the various maps, stood about 250 feet from the corner of College street, or upon the spot where Warner hall now stands, the premises occupying on this side a space of about one-half the driveway between the present Union league house and Warner hall."

Vanderbilt Hall at Yale — Gift of Cornelius Vanderbilt in Memory of His Son.

"Ground was broken for the new Vanderbilt dormitory early in June, and, since the first sod was turned, the obstacles in the way of the erection of the building have been speedily torn away and the foundations laid for the most expensive dormitory in the United States."

On a Pair of Leather Suspenders.

"Across the street Vanderbilt Hall loomed indistinctly. To the ignorant it may be necessary to explain that its courtyard is open to Chapel Street, but that an iron grill stretches from wing to wing and keeps out the town. This grill is high enough for Hagenbeck, and it used to be a favorite game with us to play animal behind it for the street's amusement. At the hour when the crowd issued from the matinée at the Hyperion Theatre, our wittiest students paced on all fours up and down behind this grill and roared for raw beef."