A Connecticut Yankee at Yale, by Wilbur L. Cross

"I had but to walk over to Carll’s Opera House, where in one season or another I might see the great contemporary actors: Booth and Barrett, Irving and Terry, Modjeska or Bernhardt, or Joe Jefferson (a favorite of the students). It may have been in New York that I first saw the elder Salvini in the role of Othello. Was it then or later that Gilbert and Sullivan’s operas came to town? I thank God that the visual age was in the far distance when novels and plays were to be washed out with pictures on a screen."

Bunnell Takes It.

"G. B. Bunnell, who has been known as the successful manager of dime museums, has leased Carll's opera house at New Haven, and announces that he shall produce first class plays, opera, etc., and more than maintain its reputation. He wants it distinctly understood that the management has nothing whatever in connection with the museum... George B. Bunnell takes control of Carll's Opera House on May 1, and from that time it will be known as the Hyperion."

The Theater of New England

"[A] prominent trait of his character -- to give the people what they want and demand. Mr. Bunnell's long training with P. T. Barnum has schooled him thoroughly in the art of amusement catering... This is the ninth year of his theatrical management in New Haven, and the years have been successions of triumphs. Mr. Bunnell... is fully equipped to supply the people with the amusements they want, for [he] so thoroughly understand[s] the wants of the New Haven public. The time will come, added Mr. Bunnell, when the Hyperion will be denominated 'The theater of New England.'"