Petey Dink: 1918 Influenza Pandemic Comic Strips, by H. A. Voight

"Help Fight The Grip. — How Not To Get It: Get fresh air and sunshine. Avoid crowded places, especially cars. Keep away from sneezers and coughers. Don't visit people!!! with colds. Keep your mouth and teeth clean. Protect the body by proper clothing. Avoid exposure by sudden changes. Avoid worry and and fatigue. How Not to Give It: Stay at home on the first indication of a cold. Don't receive visitors while sick or recovering. Don't leave your home until all symptoms have gone. Don't sneeze, spit or cough in public places. Don't hesitate to complain against careless spitters and coughers. — The State Department of Health and the Connecticut State Council of Defense urge you to DO YOUR BIT TO STOP THE GRIP."

They Gave Us Liberty: Roger Sherman, by Ellsworth S. Grant

"This archetype of the Connecticut Yankee had a reputation for taciturnity. One of his political mottoes was: 'When you are in a minority, talk, when you are in a majority, vote!' In his country drawl, daughter came out as 'dat-ter' and applesauce sounded like 'ap-plesass.' But Jefferson remarked that however awkward his manner Sherman 'never said a foolish thing in his life.' And he was by no means silent. During the Convention he spoke 138 times, each speech short but pithy, only three others were more vocal."

A Connecticut Yankee at Yale, by Wilbur L. Cross

"I had but to walk over to Carll’s Opera House, where in one season or another I might see the great contemporary actors: Booth and Barrett, Irving and Terry, Modjeska or Bernhardt, or Joe Jefferson (a favorite of the students). It may have been in New York that I first saw the elder Salvini in the role of Othello. Was it then or later that Gilbert and Sullivan’s operas came to town? I thank God that the visual age was in the far distance when novels and plays were to be washed out with pictures on a screen."

TOWN-GOWN RIOTS BANE OF NEW HAVEN

"The students of today are little different from their fathers and grandfathers of many years ago. Boys will be boys whether they represent the stirring sixties, the elegant eighties, or the trotting twenties, and the annals of the town and gown affairs in the Elm City show that while times and conditions change, the spirit of youth as depicted by the average student goes on as of yore."

Joel Schiavone a gadfly without socks or sacred cows, by Bill Ryan

"Schiavone is thinking up new projects, in the atmosphere for meditation that he has created at his offices on Chapel Street in the old Union League building. The Union League, a private, exclusive men's club formed at the turn of the century, once would not have admitted anyone named Joel Schiavone. 'It was for WASPs.' He has taken the former hangout of the very privileged and created offices that bear the unmistakable stamp of Joel Schiavone."

Hyperion Theater To Be Rebuilt

"The Hyperion Theater at New Haven, one of the twenty-five theaters owned by S. Z. Poli, is to be rebuilt. The theater will close on Saturday, April 26, and on the following Monday the work of demolishing the interior of the structure will begin. It is intended to let the four outside walls remain, but the interior will be entirely rebuilt as a modern theater."

The Wide-Awakes of Connecticut: A Most Remarkable Scene

"The successful presidential campaign of Republican Abraham Lincoln perfected the nighttime torchlight parade as an entertainment of unprecedented scale that attracted the attention of men, women, and children. The concept originated in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1858, and was revived for Lincoln’s campaign by the city’s young Republicans. Tailored oil-resistant enameled cloth capes distinguished the marchers, some of whom were too young to vote. Their example spread from Hartford to cities in the northeastern United States, which contributed traveling companies totaling some ten thousand uniformed men with torches to a Grand Procession in New York City on October 3, 1860."

Jo McKenzie, Restaurateur, by David Fink

"She has been in the thick of it for years. Her battle scars, which she wears very well, were collected in the rabbit-punch, scrape-for-contribution wars of Connecticut Republican politics. She was the party's first woman state chairman, its first woman finance chairman. And now, even as she sits resplendent in her fine black suit and… Continue reading Jo McKenzie, Restaurateur, by David Fink

Desserts that Sin Not, by Carla Van Kampen

"Temptation is not a word in the vocabulary of the pure. To submit to pleasure implies a certain weakness of spirit, of flesh, of willpower. To avoid such submission when the dessert course rolls around is asking almost too much, even from the most devout calorie-watcher. That is why the tug-of-war conversation between a tempted… Continue reading Desserts that Sin Not, by Carla Van Kampen

Who Owns the Block?

"Who owns downtown commercial properties in Connecticut's cities? This week, Business Weekly looks at a block in New Haven. The block, shown in the map, is bounded by Chapel, College, Crown and High streets. Information is from city records. -Image courtesy of the Hartford Courant, "Who Owns the Block?" by Diane Richards, May 18, 1987… Continue reading Who Owns the Block?