The only handwritten draft of the Bill of Rights, by Roger Sherman

"A handwritten working draft of the Bill of Rights — the only such document known to exist — has been found and identified in the most likely of places: the Library of Congress. This early draft was written by Representative Roger Sherman of Connecticut on an unknown date in July 1789 while the first Congress was meeting in New York. Sherman, a longtime judge of the Connecticut Superior Court who became a Senator in 1791, served with Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin on the committee that drafted the Declaration of Independence. He was the only framer to sign all three original founding documents — the Declaration, the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution."

National Archives, Founders Online: To John Adams from Roger Sherman, 20 July 1789

"If the President alone was vested with the power of appointing all officers, and was left to select a council for himself he would be liable to be deceived by flatterers and pretenders to Patriotism, who would have no motive but their own emolument. They would wish to extend the powers of the executive to increase their own importance, and however upright he might be in his intentions, there would be great danger of his being misled, even to the subversion of the constitution, or at least to introduce such evils as to interrupt the harmony of the government & deprive him of the confidence of the people. "

The Roger Sherman Watch

"It was a primitive-looking silver watch, made in France in 1760, that belonged to Roger Sherman -- was in his fob when he stood with Jefferson, &c., before Hancock, reporting 'The Declaration of Independence.'"

[The Shermans] Have Ruled America, by Dr. B. J. Cigrand

"The Sherman people have been earnest supporters of the Union: from the famous Roger down we find them loyally upholding the principles of their distinguished forefathers. In the village boards, the aldermanic councils, the list of mayors, the roll of Governors, the roster of Generals, and roll-call of House and Senate, the name Sherman is ever present."

Interviewing Connecticut’s Great Lawyer and Democrat, by James B. Morrow

"A man who resembles his distinguished great-grandfather, Roger Sherman, signer of the declaration, Gov. Simeon E. Baldwin talks on the dominant questions of the day. Every generation of Americans, he asserts, has its own point of view and, therefore, through the Supreme Court of the United States, makes the Constitution fit its own needs and conditions."