ALL OF ONE FAMILY. Three Prominent Men Descended From Roger Sherman.

"William M. Evarts, the polished, urbane, witty New Yorker; George Frisbie Hoar, the sharp, petulant, bright, nagging New Englander; John Sherman, the unostentatious, but persistent Westerner. But behind all these mannerisms we see the [Roger] Sherman imprint upon the mind of each. If one of them becomes President, it will be all in the family."

The Wide-Awakes of Connecticut: A Most Remarkable Scene

"The successful presidential campaign of Republican Abraham Lincoln perfected the nighttime torchlight parade as an entertainment of unprecedented scale that attracted the attention of men, women, and children. The concept originated in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1858, and was revived for Lincoln’s campaign by the city’s young Republicans. Tailored oil-resistant enameled cloth capes distinguished the marchers, some of whom were too young to vote. Their example spread from Hartford to cities in the northeastern United States, which contributed traveling companies totaling some ten thousand uniformed men with torches to a Grand Procession in New York City on October 3, 1860."

The Rail Splitter speech in New Haven, by Abraham Lincoln

"I am glad to see that a system of labor prevails in New England under which laborers CAN strike when they want to [Cheers,] where they are not obliged to work under all circumstances, and are not tied down and obliged to labor whether you pay them or not! [Cheers.] I like the system which… Continue reading The Rail Splitter speech in New Haven, by Abraham Lincoln

Frederick Douglass’ address in New Haven, October 25, 1888

"Despite his age, Douglass campaigned vigorously for Benjamin Harrison during the 1888 presidential campaign. After weeks spent in Indiana and Michigan, Douglass arrived in New Haven, Connecticut, for a major address on 25 October 1888. There was so much excitement in the city that crowds gathered at the railroad station to witness Douglass’s arrival. After… Continue reading Frederick Douglass’ address in New Haven, October 25, 1888

Frederick Douglass, at the inauguration of Abraham Lincoln, 1865

"I was present at the inauguration of Mr. Lincoln, the 4th of March, 1865. I felt then that there was murder in the air, and I kept close to his carriage on the way to the Capitol, for I felt that I might see him fall that day. It was a vague presentiment. At that… Continue reading Frederick Douglass, at the inauguration of Abraham Lincoln, 1865